Pepi hates doorbells and scary alarms.

On my second full day of cardiac rehab the nurses noticed while exercising that my EKG was looking weird.  They got concerned and called over to my cardiologist office where my device clinic also is.  This device clinic monitors and sets my ICD/Pacemaker even remotely.  The tech must have gotten concerned about what the nurses said so she immediately came running over from her building which fortunately was across the street at the hospital cardiac gym.  She had a Medtronic briefcase with her which has the computer and software that connects to my device and I was hooked up and the EKG reviewed.  She said that my pacemaker was set at a max of 130 bpm which is the norm for most heart failure patients but that I was blowing past that when on the treadmill and had taken my heart rate up to 140 bpm and that had thrown the pacemaker for a loop. The good news was that my heart seems OK with this level of exercise.  Again not your average heart patient.  But not good news since the pacemaker is supposed to pace 100% of the time to keep my heart beating normally.  So she adjusted the upper threshold and we came home.  

The next morning, I was sitting in my living room on my chair drinking a cup of coffee and reading up on the news on my laptop.  Pepi my little Chihuahua was sitting next to me like he does every morning.  It’s a ritual for us.  Jude was in her study on a conference call.  Suddenly I heard a loud French ambulance sound.  Wa Wa, Wa Wa, Wa Wa, I looked around going what the heck is that… and realized it was coming from my chest.  Pepi who has an aversion to door bells, whether actual or even just on TV and usually goes into a frenzy, practically jumped out of his skin just barking away.  He was looking at me like…”you have a door bell in your chest????”.  I noticed all this in the 20 seconds this alarm was going off while also realizing that my anxiety level had suddenly shot up to Def con 5 or is it Def con 1?  Anyway, my panicked mind was screaming that I was about to get shocked any second now! Then suddenly the alarm stopped. I guess I had been yelling Jude’s name as she came running.  Both the dog and I must have seemed hysterical.   Anyway, I called the ICD clinic and the tech said, “no worries, the pacemaker is telling you that something is still not set right”.  He asked us to drive downtown to the clinic so he could reset it.  Which we did immediately.  Apparently, some setting the other technician set the day before was not to the pacemakers liking so this guy reset it and then changed my upper limit and nonchalantly said “don’t worry your heart is all fine and this was just a way for the pacemaker to let you know to get it looked at right away”.  That was fine and dandy considering he didn’t have an alarm blaring in his chest!   Talk about a weird feeling and experience not to mention freaking me and Pepi out! 

So, the cardiac rehab continues well and I am grateful for the nurse there that noticed my erratic EKG leading to a recalibration of my device especially during activity/exercise.

Dragons and Tigers

8 more Sundays to go.  Day 1 today.  Counting down to 7pm tonight with the rest of my GOT tribe.  Enough said.  Hopefully the alarm won’t go off.

And in the meantime Tiger roared in Augusta today….. Made a lot of us that follow the game feel good to see that and a great round of golf at that spectacular course.

16 Comments Add yours

  1. slmret says:

    Wow — an alarm coming from the chest would be really scary! On the other hand, isn’t technology wonderful?!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Masood says:

      My wife says I am quickly approaching bionic man status……..Speaking of which I just realized as I type this that now I am constantly under the watch of Medtronic no matter where I go and permanently tied to the grid. Big brother is watching. Hmmmmm.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. slmret says:

        I have a friend with a pacemaker with no underlying heartbeat! Truly a bionic man — without the pacemaker, he’d be a goner!

        Like

  2. Zakiah says:

    Yeah, I was scared just reading your text message. But now I think it is kind of funny. Can you imagine you (no not you, but someone else with that device) are walking somewhere, and this thing goes off. The cars and taxis will be pulling away to the curb and letting you pass!!
    That is a sick thought Zakiah!!
    Seriously though babe, I was petrified and knew how afraid you must have been when you heard that alarm. Poor Pepi. Hope it NEVER EVER happens to you or to anyone again. Love you. A LOT.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Masood says:

      Funny you should say that Alabeti. It seems most elderly people when outside and hear the tones seem to think it is a passing ambulance and never realize its their pacemaker going off. Lol. Not sure how you could miss it. It is very loud. I replied to Tasneem on this post explaining more about ICD tones. Love back.

      Like

  3. Judith Sayeed says:

    It’s funny now, but not at the time! Masood was calling me, and the dog was barking up a storm! At least we know it works!

    And on a serious note, I’m really happy that you are writing honey……

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Tasneem says:

    Bhaiya …what an experience …am sure like me all who read this could perfectly visualize and imagine the tension and shock you must have felt …Pepi is going to look at you everytime the doorbell rings from now on !!!

    Like

    1. Masood says:

      He has been a bit odd around me lately… sort of scared. Does not like sharp loud noises. Too bad I can’t control the ICD myself and set it off when he does something bad. Lol. It seems there are 3 tones the device emits. A solid tone when a magnet is near which is how they turn it off to work on it, a low intensity which is like a truck backing up tone and high intensity which is like a French ambulance. Youtube Medtronic ICD tones and lots of info there if curious. Nothing beats the oddity of your body emitting a electronic tone.

      Like

  5. shaista71 says:

    Oh my goodness Masood Bhaiya!! What an experience! So glad everything worked out! Can you please just have some boring non-eventful days please!!!? I don’t think my heart can handle another post like this.😳

    Like

  6. OH MY GOSH! Scary! 😮 (Did they warn you ahead of time that this could happen? If not, shame on them! If they did, it would still be scary and shocking when it happened!)
    But maybe you can laugh about it now. ??? 😀
    Poor Pepi! That would freak my doggie Cooper out, too. He doesn’t like doorbells or smoke alarms, etc.
    I’m so glad you are okay!
    Continued bestest wishes in your recovery and rehab!
    (((HUGS))) 🙂

    Like

    1. Masood says:

      They did tell me the next day after surgery in the hospital when I was in a fog. Experiencing it live was something else. Thank you for the wishes again.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, they often say important things when we are foggy. 🙂 It’d be nice if they gave all of those things in writing. 🙂
        I can’t even imagine the shock of that! 😮 😦
        (((HUGS)))

        Like

  7. That is pretty scary… I’m not sure how I would react. But I’m glad everything is ok now.

    Like

  8. Poor Pepi. An alarm in the chest would scare the heck out of me..but I’m glad you have it ..in case and glad you are doing okay.

    Like

  9. I just wanted to check back in, Masood…to see how you are doing.
    Continued well wishes, healing thoughts, and prayers for you.
    (((HUGS)))

    Like

    1. Masood says:

      Doing well. Thank you for well wishes… blogging again……: }

      Liked by 1 person

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